Immunity

The Immune System and its role in our body!

The immune system is the body’s defence against infectious organisms and other invaders. Through a series of steps called the immune response, the immune system attacks organisms and substances that invade body systems and cause disease.

The immune system is made up of a network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to protect the body. One of the important cells involved are white blood cells, also called leukocytes, which come in two basic types that combine to seek out and destroy disease-causing organisms or substances.

Leukocytes are produced or stored in many locations in the body, including the thymus, spleen, and bone marrow. For this reason, they’re called the lymphoid organs. There are also clumps of lymphoid tissue throughout the body, primarily as lymph nodes, that house the leukocytes.

The two basic types of leukocytes are:

  1. phagocytes, cells that chew up invading organisms
  2. lymphocytes, cells that allow the body to remember and recognise previous invaders and help the body destroy them

 

Here’s how it works:

When antigens (foreign substances that invade the body) are detected, several types of cells work together to recognise them and respond. These cells trigger the B lymphocytes to produce antibodies, which are specialised proteins that lock onto specific antigens.

Once produced, these antibodies stay in a person’s body, so that if his or her immune system encounters that antigen again, the antibodies are already there to do their job. So if someone gets sick with a certain disease, like chickenpox, that person usually won’t get sick from it again.

This is also how immunizations prevent certain diseases. An immunization introduces the body to an antigen in a way that doesn’t make someone sick, but does allow the body to produce antibodies that will then protect the person from future attack by the germ or substance that produces that particular disease.

Although antibodies can recognise an antigen and lock onto it, they are not capable of destroying it without help. That’s the job of the T cells, which are part of the system that destroys antigens that have been tagged by antibodies or cells that have been infected or somehow changed. (Some T cells are actually called “killer cells.”) T cells also are involved in helping signal other cells to do their jobs.

All of these specialised cells and parts of the immune system offer the body protection against disease. This protection is called immunity.

 

The Immune System and its role in our body!

The immune system is the body’s defence against infectious organisms and other invaders. Through a series of steps called the immune response, the immune system attacks organisms and substances that invade body systems and cause disease.

The immune system is made up of a network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to protect the body. One of the important cells involved are white blood cells, also called leukocytes, which come in two basic types that combine to seek out and destroy disease-causing organisms or substances.

Leukocytes are produced or stored in many locations in the body, including the thymus, spleen, and bone marrow. For this reason, they’re called the lymphoid organs. There are also clumps of lymphoid tissue throughout the body, primarily as lymph nodes, that house the leukocytes.

The two basic types of leukocytes are:

  1. phagocytes, cells that chew up invading organisms
  2. lymphocytes, cells that allow the body to remember and recognise previous invaders and help the body destroy them

 

Here’s how it works:

When antigens (foreign substances that invade the body) are detected, several types of cells work together to recognise them and respond. These cells trigger the B lymphocytes to produce antibodies, which are specialised proteins that lock onto specific antigens.

Once produced, these antibodies stay in a person’s body, so that if his or her immune system encounters that antigen again, the antibodies are already there to do their job. So if someone gets sick with a certain disease, like chickenpox, that person usually won’t get sick from it again.

This is also how immunizations prevent certain diseases. An immunization introduces the body to an antigen in a way that doesn’t make someone sick, but does allow the body to produce antibodies that will then protect the person from future attack by the germ or substance that produces that particular disease.

Although antibodies can recognise an antigen and lock onto it, they are not capable of destroying it without help. That’s the job of the T cells, which are part of the system that destroys antigens that have been tagged by antibodies or cells that have been infected or somehow changed. (Some T cells are actually called “killer cells.”) T cells also are involved in helping signal other cells to do their jobs.

All of these specialised cells and parts of the immune system offer the body protection against disease. This protection is called immunity.

Ways in which to boost your immunity are to:

  • Wash your hands
  • Brush your teeth
  • Eat a whole foods diet such as vegetables, meats, seeds, nuts and less sugars, cereals, soft drinks, breads and pastries to name a few.
  • Get enough sleep
  • Get out in the fresh air
  • Reduce your stress
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Adequate exercise

Remember prevention is better than cure, look after yourself now to prevent disease and sickness in the future. 🙂

Nic

Nicole
Nicole McDermott
nic@thechieflife.com

I am passionate about working with people on a holistic level to balance hormones, improve mood, manage weight all whilst educating people on the benefits of a balanced whole foods diet. Follow more great advice from Nic here.